Tag Archives: telecommunication

Product Innovation & Development Benchmarking for Telcos

It’s no secret that the global telecoms market is evolving with increasing speed, upending traditional models. Telecom service providers are currently experiencing slower revenue growth from traditional voice and data services. As they look to introduce new products and services, they are facing off with technology companies considered as innovation powerhouses. Can Telecom service providers keep up with the innovation and agility of the high-tech leaders to compete with them effectively?

The ​​PwC Product Innovation & Development Study
In 2015, PwC conducted a refresh of this comprehensive product innovation & development study utilizing PwC’s core Service Innovation framework, spanning strategy through execution & enablement:

telcos banchmarks

​Key findings from this study include:

  • Where leading global telecom operators and leading tech companies fall on the product development innovation scale
  • What’s improved and what still lags vs. a decade ago
  • Key factors that help reduce cost overruns and schedule slippage while also driving faster cycle times
  • A symbiotic link between EBIT and product development performance
  • The leading practices to achieve higher business performance and what should be the targets to achieve measurable improvements

Check out the full PwC report for more details!

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Zero infrastructure – “anything as a service”

For any company embarking on this change journey, where to start – and where to focus – depends on the business’s specific industry, size, business model, and current digital maturity. However, the key components of an ideal cloud-centric operating model remain consistent. So, to help communication service providers (CSPs) – including wireline, wireless, cable, and other/integrated communications carriers – map out and undertake the optimal journey to a cloud – enabled “zero infrastructure” future for their IT, we’ve developed the framework for a cloud-centric operating model.

For CSPs worldwide, cloud presents exciting opportunities to drive speed and agility, and to lower costs throughout their operations. These benefits mean that harnessing the cloud is critical to many parts of the CSPs’ strategic agenda, and make navigating the transition to a cloud-centric operating model an urgent priority for many companies.

The key question is how to get started. The solution lies in combining a methodical approach with a commitment to moving at pace. To help CSPs achieve this, we’ve developed the approach enabling a successful transition managed through a clear five-step process. CSPs that undertake this journey will be well placed to compete and win in tomorrow’s communications services marketplace – and to realize the aspiration of zero infrastructure “anything as a service”.

More details @ http://www.pwc.com/communicationsreview

Customer experience as the ultimate differentiator

The prospect of a “smart home” with solutions such as automated lighting, 24/7 video recording and cloud-based HVAC management has sparked a frenzy of market activity. In the past year, multi-service operators (MSOs), telecommunication companies (telcos), original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), start-ups, and tech heavyweights have all entered the space with competing and complementary offerings. With so many players:

  • How can any one company differentiate itself from the pack and own the home?
  • Which specific strategies should companies adopt to ensure long-term success?
  • Where should Connected Home players look to drive sustainable revenue growth?

In the September issue of Communications Review, PwC presents, Owning the connected home: Customer experience as the ultimate differentiator”. In the article, they look at how telecoms companies can win customer loyalty by owning the connected home.

Telecommunications companies are not doing enough to address cyberthreats

As the telecommunications industry continues its shift to a digital business model, organisations are recasting themselves as technology companies that offer a broad array of digital communications, connectivity, and content services.

They are racing to deliver not only high-quality and reliable communications services, but also to provide fresh content across a range of computing platforms to an expanding range of customers. Digitisation also has led to new products and services that are created and delivered in innovative ways, resulting in a raft of new collaborations, joint ventures, and strategic alliances across industries. At the same time, a slew of big deals are in the works, including mergers of telecommunications companies, multi-system operators, satellite television providers, and mobile communications networks. Some telecoms are acquiring businesses outside of their traditional scope to gain intellectual property and broaden their services.

Many of these changes are compounding network traffic and demanding that telecoms deliver enhanced capacity and quality of services – without raising fees to customers. That represents a formidable challenge as new entrants to the telecom market and lower pricing structures intensify competition and, in some cases, erode revenues.

Making matters more difficult: The frequency and scope of cybersecurity and privacy risks continue to mount. While breaches have typically targeted customer data, there is growing concern that ultra-sophisticated adversaries like nation-states, organised crime, and hacktivists will initiate attacks that disrupt services and even cause physical damage. A recent attack on a French television network provides an example that is uncomfortably close to home: In April, politically motivated hackers infiltrated a major television broadcaster, knocking 11 channels off the air and compromising websites and social media accounts.

As telecoms pivot toward a more digital future, they will very likely encounter entirely new types of cybersecurity risks to data, applications, and networks. Yet according to findings from The Global State of Information Security® Survey 2015 (GSISS),many telecommunications companies are not doing enough to address cyberthreats for today – or the future.