Tag Archives: survey

Three main global trends that will shape the future: key findings for Romania

The Romanian CEOs think there are three main global trends that will impact their companies in the next few years, according to the 17th edition of the PwC Global CEO Survey. Almost all believe that technological breakthroughs will have a major impact. More than half of respondents state that they will feel the impact of demographic changes, as well as resource shortages and climate change. Also, urbanisation is one of the global trends that will reshape businesses.

According to the findings of the 2014 CEO Survey in Romania, 92% of the CEOS have mentioned technological breakthroughs as one of the three main global trends that will transform their companies in the next five years. The percentage is higher than the Global and European ones (81%). Both climate change and resource shortages have been mentioned by 51% of the Romanian CEOs, while urbanisation was mentioned by 47% of them.

“There is a wide consensus among the Romanian CEOs about the role of technological breakthorughs in reshaping their companies in the next few years. On the background of a stronger feeling that the future started yesterday, innovation is the most important opportunity for growth. And innovation is not just about manufacturing techniques or developing new services, but also about ways to approach and attract clients”, stated Vasile Iuga, Country Managing Partner, PwC România.

This is the fourth consecutive year when PwC Romania launches a separate edition based on the answers of an increasing number of local CEOs who joined our initiative. PwC gathered valuable insight on their views and on their strategy when it comes to tackling opportunities for growth, or to dealing with challenges of local and global economies.

This year’s edition of the Global CEO Survey was released earlier this year within the World Economic Forum at Davos and it presents the perspective of more than 1344 CEOs worldwide on the current economic situation and their take on building a stronger foundation for future growth.

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Communications industry concerned about keeping up with technological change

Communications alliancesCommunications industry CEOs are concerned about their company’s ability to keep up with the speed of technological change. And they’re looking to strategic alliances or joint ventures to propel growth, as shows the recently released CEO Survey.

Innovation still on top of CEO’s agenda

Communications industry CEOs know they need to innovate. Product/service innovation was selected by 41% of communications respondents when asked what they see as the main opportunity to grow their business (as compared with 35% of respondents from the global sample). And 49% of Communications industry CEOs said developing an innovation ecosystem that supports growth is a priority over the next three years.

 Restructuring is top priority

In the last twelve months 62% of Communications industry CEOs entered into a strategic alliance or joint venture, compared with 34% from the global sample. More activity is on the horizon: 54% of Communications CEOs say they plan to enter into a new strategic alliance or joint venture in the coming twelve months.

Planning time horizon

When asked “what is your current planning time horizon?” 56% of communications industry CEOs answered “three years”. The industry is changing too quickly to predict what will happen in just five years.

 Still confident on growth

72% of Communications industry CEOs are somewhat or very confident about their company’s prospects for revenue growth over the next twelve months. However, when asked about their confidence level about their company’s prospects for growth over the next three years, a stunning 90% said they are somewhat or very confident.

Considering the conclusion of this report, here are some cross-industry questions that would help us plan for the future:

  • What  does the “right” innovation strategy for my own business look like? Do we want to keep everything in house? Create an incubator? Develop a JV?
  • The control-oriented management style that’s well suited for traditional connectivity services clashes with the fast-paced decision-making requirements of innovation today. So how can we best organize the business to foster innovation?
  • The market’s expectation of “anything, everywhere, anytime” combined with shifting profit pools across the content, application, services, and network value chains requires an examination of relevance in this rapidly evolving ecosystem.  What is our response to these market changes?

CEO Survey – Economic Perspectives and Labour Market Tendencies in Romania in 2012

PwC released earlier this year, within the World Economic Forum at Davos, the 15th edition of the Global CEO Survey 2012, a report that analyzes the views and forecasts of over 1,200 CEOs from around the world, making it one of the most important instruments for testing the future trends of the global economy. This year is the second time that PwC Romania launches a separate edition based on the answers of local CEOs, thus providing local business leaders with the opportunity to share their vision, priorities and concerns regarding the evolution of the local and global economy.

PwC Romania has the pleasure to invite you to the launch of the results for Romania from the 15th edition of the Global CEO Survey 2012. The launch will take place within an event organised jointly with Ziarul Financiar, CEO Survey – Economic Perspectives and Labour Market Tendencies in Romania in 2012, scheduled for 28 May, at Radisson Blu Hotel (Atlas Hall) in Bucharest, starting with 9:00 am. Please find the agenda below:

Agenda of the event:
9.00 – 9.30        Welcome coffee and networking
9.30 – 9.40        Introductory address Sorin Pîslaru, Head Editor, Ziarul Financiar
9.40 – 10.00      Keynote speech Mariana Câmpeanu, Minister of Labour, Family and Social Protection
10.00 – 10.30   Presentation of the main results of Romania CEO Survey – Vasile Iuga, Country Managing Partner, PwC Romania
10.30 – 12.30   Round table and Q&A attended by Mariana Câmpeanu, Vasile Iuga, Sorin Mândrutescu, CEO Oracle Romania and President of AmCham Romania , Robert Arsene, CEO Agricover, Dan Şucu, CEO Mobexpert, and Sorin Pîslaru, Ziarul Financiar

The next decade – the “most innovative time” ?

A recent PwC survey found that that innovation is high on the executive agenda in virtually every industry. In all, 78% of CEOs surveyed believe innovation will generate “significant” new revenue and cost reduction opportunities over the next three years. But it is highest for those where technology is changing customer expectations. In both the pharmaceutical and entertainment and media sectors, for example, more than 40% of CEOs believe their greatest opportunities for growth come from spawning new products and services.

Additionally, the survey found that CEOs are re-thinking their approach to innovation and increasingly seeking to collaborate with outside partners and in markets other than where they are based. For example, a majority of entertainment and media CEOs said they expect to co-develop new products and services.

The innovation process generally has four phases: 

  • Discovery: Identifying and sourcing ideas and problems that are the basis for future innovation. Sources may include employees as well as customers, suppliers, partners and other external organisations.
  • Incubation: Refining, developing and testing good ideas to see if they are technically feasible and make business sense.
  • Acceleration: Establishing pilot programs to test commercial feasibility.
  • Scale:  Integrating the innovation into the company; commercialisation and mass marketing.

However, the drive for innovation must arise from the CEO and other executive leadership by creating a culture that is open to new ideas and systematic in its approach to their development.

Therefore, the study also identifies 7 misconceptions about the innovation process:

  • Innovation can be delegated.  Not so. The drive to innovate begins at the top. If the CEO doesn’t protect and reward the process, it will fail.
  • Middle Management is the ally of innovation. Managers are not natural champions of innovation. They to reject new ideas in favor of efficiency.
  • Innovative people work for the money. Establishing a culture that embeds innovation in the organisation will attract and retain creative talent.
  • Innovation is a lucky accident. Successful innovation most often results from a disciplined process that sorts through many ideas.
  • The more open the innovation process, the less disciplined. Advances in collaborative tools, like social networking, are accelerating open innovation.
  • Businesses know how much innovation they need. Leaders must calculate their potential for inorganic growth to determine their need to innovate.
  • Innovation can’t be measured. Leadership needs to identify its ROII (Return on Innovation Investment).

Details about the study here.

A shared agenda for businesses and governments

This is one of the new trains that will be run...
Image via Wikipedia

Government leadership in building infrastructure is critical for competitiveness. A majority of CEOs identified the priority for the governments of all countries outside of Western Europe and Japan, where infrastructure is well developed, and of China – where the government allocated almost US$600 billion of stimulus spending for infrastructure projects over the past two years, according to PwC’s 14 Annual CEO Survey.

The role of private capital in financing infrastructure is unavoidable: an estimated US$3 trillion per year needs to be spent on infrastructure across the globe in the coming decades, according to a recent report from the World Economic Forum.

However, businesses can provide more than cash: they have expertise, and the abilities to execute and manage risks. This is part of what makes PPPs attractive. As Berthold Leetfink, Deputy Secretary General of the Ministry of Economics, Agriculture and Innovation in the Netherlands told PwC, “At least for the Netherlands, and I think for many other countries, planning and building infrastructure is very much in the hands of government. But it’s obvious that the private sector has a lot of knowledge in terms of building cheaply, efficiently or in a more environmentally friendly way.” As an example, a PPP project in 2009 to connect a 12-mile regional rapid transit line in Vancouver (Canada Line) was completed several months ahead of schedule.

Needless to say, businesses also have a key expectation for their governments: to tackle fiscal deficits to restore stability to the markets in a way that is mindful of the fragile environment for global growth. Public revenues are of course expected to be part of the equation: a majority of CEOs expect taxes will rise, led by 65% of CEOs in Asia and 70% in Latin America.

For a full report, you may click here.

CSR survey: only 27% of the CSR reports explicitly quantified objectives

budget cuts - the axeman cometh
Image by byronv2 via Flickr

A recent study – “CSR Trends” reviewed 602 companies listed in five Standard & Poor’s indices, as well as private companies and crown corporations. The survey does not evaluate the accuracy of the information being reported in the documents or a company’s compliance with any regulation but rather how effective companies have been in communicating their CSR strategies and performance.

The results show that CSR has changed from a nice activity to a core business value that defines the most significant businesses in the world. There are, however, differences in the way CSR results are communicated and here are some key findings:

–    81% of companies have CSR information on their websites but only 50% consider this information sufficiently important to deserve a link on the corporate home page;

–    80% of the companies, many of them worldwide brands such as Coca Cola, Nike, IBM, provide comprehensive explanations of their business activities. Surprisingly, 20% of the companies, many of them smaller and less well known than the multinationals mentioned above, did not provide a profile, essentially eliminating the context of their CSR strategies and achievements;

–    Targets that are specific, measurable and have a deadline are significantly more meaningful than a general statement of good intend. Nevertheless, only 65% of companies seamed to realise that and include a summary of objectives on a dedicated space inside the report and only 27% of those objectives have been quantified.

–    CSR is an interactive endeavour that requires constant communication with stakeholders. However, only 24% of companies use social media such as Twitter or Facebook to communicate their CSR activities.

This survey’s research was conducted jointly by PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Sustainable Business Solutions practice and Craib Design & Communications. The entire report can be downloaded here.

Why confronting corruption makes sense

Detail from Corrupt Legislation. Mural by Elih...
Image via Wikipedia

Management and staff become distracted and demoralised as they investigate what went wrong and respond to legal, regulatory and enforcement actions. In some recent cases, costs have soared into the billions, significantly affecting earnings.

In addition to the external fallout, as customers and partners distance themselves from a troubled company, there are daunting internal costs. Failing to actively prevent corruption allows employees and third parties to rationalize stealing from the company. Companies with anti-corruption programmes that enable bribe payments are also highly susceptible to theft and financial statement manipulation.

Companies that do not take steps to assess and manage corruption risk stand a greater chance of being caught in the anti-corruption net. With the passing of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) in 1977, the US took the early initiative in enforcement. Under the act, any company listed on a US exchange or with significant operations in the US is subject to the rules and regulations of the US Department of Justice, regardless of where corruption occurs geographically. More recently, enforcement has become a more global affair, with the US working closely with authorities in other countries. In the last years, at least 20 of the 37 government signatories to the 1997 OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials began one or more investigations into corruption, up from 12 in 2006.

Looked at logically, bribes do not make good business sense. They may not alter the situation in any way and there is no contract to enforce if the services paid for are not rendered. Having paid once, a company also opens the door to future and perhaps larger demands and becomes susceptible to blackmail. “If you pay someone $1,000 for a service, do you think the next time they will only ask for $1,000?” says Albert Wong, head of policy and external relations at Shell International. He tells his staff to avoid this slippery slope by refusing the first demand.

While companies cannot control how governments and competitors behave, there are tools available to help level the playing field. One example is the so-called “integrity pact,” where all parties sign an enforceable agreement not to engage in corruption. Our survey highlights the importance of getting everyone to play by the same rules. Almost 45% of respondents say they currently avoid certain markets or opportunities because of corruption risks and almost 40% say they have lost bids because of corrupt officials.

A global PwC report shows that:

• Almost 80% of respondents say their company has some form of programme in place to prevent and detect corruption, but only 22% are very confident that it identifies and mitigates the risk of corruption.
• Slightly less than half say their programme is clearly communicated and enforced, while 28% say there are problems with either the communication or the enforcement of their anti-corruption programme.
• Rigorous risk assessment, a crucial step in programme design, is overlooked by more than half of those surveyed, and only 25% perform proactive risk assessments or monitoring.
• Only 40% of respondents believe their current controls are effective at identifying high-risk business partners or suspect disbursements.

The potential of corruption may always be present; however, companies can learn from others and set up a robust and proactive anti-corruption programme to mitigate their risk.

You may find more about confronting corruption here.

The world in 2020: 79% of CEOs said they would be changing their strategies for managing talent as a result of the downturn

Fanning the flame of Talent
Image by Ian Sane via Flickr

A recent PwC report – Talent Mobility 2020 shows that in the next 10 years companies will have a greater need to deploy their talent around the world, and as a consequence, international assignment levels and overall mobility will increase significantly. Having access to the best talent continues to be a challenge for CEOs and business leaders – with 97% of CEOs in PwC’s annual global CEO survey saying that having the right talent is the most critical factor for their business growth. In addition, 79% of CEOs said they would be changing their strategies for managing talent as a result of the downturn – and 55% said they would look to change their approach to global mobility including international secondments. In the wake of a foreseeable upturn, the winners and losers of the next decade will be defined by those who are able to attract, retain, and deploy their key talent globally. The sentiments outlined above are well aligned with PwC’s key findings:

Assignee levels have increased by 25% over the last decade; PwC predicts a further 50% growth in assignments by 2020. There will be more assignees, more business travel, more virtual tools, and especially more quick, short-term, and commuter assignments.

The growing importance of emerging markets will create a significant shift in mobility patterns, as skilled employees from emerging markets increasingly operate across their home continent and beyond, creating greater diversity in the global talent pool.

Mobility strategies will need to become more sophisticated and complex as organizations meet growing deployment demands, while simultaneously managing the very different needs and expectations of three generations of workers.

Governments and regulators will accept the economic benefits of talent mobility to stimulate economic growth. This acceptance will lead to greater collaboration between governments and businesses, and within the business community, to remove some of the barriers to mobility around the world.

The millennial generation will view overseas assignments as a rite of passage, an outlook that will change the way workers and organizations approach overseas opportunities in the future.

Organizations will adopt “destination pay and local plus” remuneration methodologies as compensation levels across some skill sets and industries will begin to harmonise across the globe.

Technology will play a key role in global working arrangements and help to support compliance obligations; however technology will not erode the need to have people deployed “on the ground”.

The nature of overseas assignments has changed significantly since the 1970s. Businesses, like the population, seam to continue adjusting their operations, nature and geographic location of the workforce, as well as their fundamental structure and roles.

How an organisation responds to these rapid changes will be critical. Business and mobilisation strategies will need to progress quickly to keep ahead of both changes in the organisation’s geographic landscape, and the further increases in assignee numbers that will result. The winners of 2020 will be those companies that adjust their strategies now.

For details see PwC’s report

Aristotle and economy

Almost 90% of worldwide executives made cost cuts during 2009, a percentage that is not surprising at all considering the economic downturn. However, according to PwC’s “2010 Global CEOs Survey”, almost 80% of executives realised that they need long term results, not just short term liquidity.

What does this have to do with Aristotle? You may find the answer in the article bellow published in the last issue of “Capital” (Romanian only):

Online: Capital.ro

Entertainment and media forecasted to grow by 5% annually until 2014

Advertising in Stratford, England
Image via Wikipedia

Following a year of decline in 2009, the global E&M market, as a whole, is forecasted to grow by 5% compounded annually for the entire period to 2014 reaching US$1.7 trillion, up from US$1.3 trillion in 2009. Fastest growing region throughout the forecast period is Latin America growing at 8.8% compound annual rate (CAR) during the next 5 years to US$77 billion in 2014. Asia Pacific is next at 6.4% CAR through to 2014 to US$475 billion. Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) follows at 4.6% to US$581 billion in 2014. The largest, but slowest growing market is North America growing at 3.9% CAR taking it from US$460 billion in 2009 to US$558 billion in 2014.

Consumers seam to embrace new media experiences with staggering speed. The advancing digital transformation is driving audience fragmentation to a level not previously seen. However, the current wave of change is of a different magnitude from previous ones both in its speed and its simultaneous impact across all segments.

Although there is consistency in the inevitable migration to digital, the ways in which this presents itself and the pace of change continues to vary by market. Regional and country variations in current market size and future growth reflect local factors around infrastructure, access availability and consumer behaviour. For example the mobile internet explosion has already happened in Japan, accounting for some 53% of global spending on mobile Internet access in 2009 while other markets are still at the bottom of their growth curve.

Advertising on the rebound

Advertising revenues have been particularly hit by the turbulent markets and while there are signs of a rebound, this is still fragile in nature. Spend is unlikely to return to former levels. By 2014, the US advertising spend is expected to still be 9% below its level in 2006. Overall, global advertising will increase at a 4.2% CAR from US$406 billion in 2009 to US$498 billion in 2014. Internet advertising will join television in 2014 as the only media with spending in excess of US$100 billion.

The projections reflect the fragmentation of the market and behavioural changes of consumers. The advertising industry is responding to consumers’ shifting attention and has embarked upon a long-term journey towards total marketing or total brand communication. Brands are changing their focus from advertising on a medium, to marketing through, and with, content.

Conversing with consumers

Consumer feedback and usage provides the only reliable guide to the commercial viability of products and services, and the global consumer base is being used as a test-bed for new offerings and consumption modes. However, as responses are still evolving it is up to the industry to anticipate and identify where they are heading and pre-empt the needs and wants of consumers. PwC believes that three themes will emerge from changing consumer behaviour:

The rising power of mobility and devices: Advances in technology and products will see increasingly converged, multi-functional and interoperable mobile devices come of age as a consumption platform by the end of 2011. Consumers are increasingly demanding “ubiquity”, with content flowing across different devices to support ever-greater interactivity and convenience. They are using mobile in new ways, and downloading ever-increasing numbers of mobile applications (“apps”) to support their lifestyles. The ability to consume and interact with content anywhere, anytime—and to share and discuss that content experience with other people via social networks—will become an increasingly integral part of people’s lives.

The growing dominance of the Internet experience over all content consumption: Using the Internet is now one of the great unifying experiences of the current era for consumers everywhere—and their expectation of Internet-style interactivity and access to content will continue to expand across media consumption in every segment. This trend is initially at its clearest in television. Equally, people are already consuming magazines and newspapers on Internet-enabled tablets, and streaming personalised music services such as Pandora in preference to buying physical CDs or even digital downloads.

Increasing engagement and readiness to pay for content—driven by improved consumption experiences and convenience: Ongoing fragmentation means that media offerings will need greater consumer engagement and quality to get themselves heard – and paid. Consumers are more willing to pay for content when accompanied by convenience and flexibility in usage, personalisation , and/or a differentiated experience that cannot be created elsewhere. Local relevance will also become important once again as an aspect of convenience and relevance.

Revolutionising the business

Digital migration and the changes in consumer behaviour have put extreme pressure on existing business models. It has caused the industry to radically rethink its approach to monetising content as it strives to capture new sources of revenue, be it from transactions or from participation with others operating in the evolving digital value chain.

Inevitably this results in individual companies searching for where to position themselves in the new digital world. Partnering with other organisations is becoming imperative in order to create viable commercial content offerings while sharing the costs and risks. Increasingly potential partners are being found from a diverse set of industries.

Whatever the partnership or collaboration PwC identifies seven critical factors for operating succesfully in the new value chain:
• Strategic flexibility
• Delivery of engagement and reationship with the customer through the consumption experience
• Economics of scale and scope
• Speed of decision-making and execution, with the appetite to experiment and fail
• Agility in talent management
• Ability to monetise brand/rights across platforms
• Strong capabilities in partnership structuring and M&A targeting and integration

2010 – 2014 Media Outlook in numbers

• There were 12 countries in 2009 with E&M spending above US$20 billion, led by the United States at US$428 billion and Japan at US$164 billion. Of the leading countries, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) will be by far the fastest growing with a projected 12% compound annual increase, fuelled by a vibrant economy and large increases in broadband penetration that in turn propel other segments. Japan will be the slowest growing of the leading countries at 2.8% compounded annually.
• Internet access is a key driver of spending in most segments. Increased broadband penetration will boost wired access while growing smartphone penetration and wireless network upgrades will drive mobile access. Spending on wired and mobile Internet access will rise from US$228 billion in 2009 to US$351 billion in 2014.
• PwC expects a relatively flat market in aggregate global advertising and consumer/end-user spending in 2010, improved growth in 2011 and a return to mid-single-digit gains during 2014. Overall global advertising will increase at a 4.2% CAR from US$406 billion in 2009 to US$498 billion in 2014. Overall consumer/end-user spending will rise from US$688 billion in 2009 to US$842 billion in 2014, a 4.1% compound annual increase.
• Globally, the video game market will grow from US$52.5 billion in 2009 to US$86.8 billion in 2014, growing at a compound growth rate of 10.6%. This will make it the second fastest-growing segment of E&M behind internet advertising wired and mobile, but will be the fastest-growing consumer/end user segment ahead of TV subscriptions and license fees.
• The global television subscription and license fee market will increase from $185.9 billion in 2009 to US$258.1 billion in 2014, a CAGR of 6.8%. This will outpace TV advertising, which will grow at a CAGR of 5.7%. The biggest component of this market is subscription spending and this will increase at 7.5% CAR to US$210.8 billion in 2014. Asia Pacific will be the fastest-growing region with a 10% compund annual increase rising to US$47.1 billion in 2014 from US$29.2 billion in 2009.
• Total global spending on consumer magazines fell by 10.6 percent in 2009. PwC projects an additional 2.7% decrease in 2010, a flat market in 2011, and modest growth during 2012–14. As a result, spending will total $74 billion in 2014, up 0.7 percent compounded annually from $71.5 billion in 2009.
• Electronic educational books will grow at a CAGR of 36.5% globally throughout the forecast period yet will still only account for less than 6% of global spend on educational books in 2014.

Details on PwC’s study: www.pwc.com